Category Archives: Digitalisation

‘Get a free ebook today!’

It is a common misconception that ebooks are cheap products, and are less valuable than their printed counterparts. To the consumer, it perhaps seems that all a publisher has done is copy and pasted the text of a printed novel into a piece of software, saved it, and uploaded it to an ecommerce site. What the consumer might not realise is that there are costs involved in the publishing of ebooks, just as there are costs in making a physical product (have a look at this article on The New York Times’ website for some information about the costs of publishing an ebook). The misunderstanding that the price of an ebook is mostly profit for the publisher is problematic, and it needs to be addressed. Continue reading

My top reading devices for students

I mentioned a couple of days ago that I might be on the lookout for a Kindle. Since then, I’ve realised perhaps that a tablet would be a better choice than a simple ebook reader. For either the same price or a little extra, I could get a tablet and download various ebook apps (and also be free from guilt in class when we inevitably end up discussing evil Amazon and their publishing takeover with an Amazon product in my bag!). I still love buying books and borrowing them from the library, but, as I said earlier this week, it makes my commute a lot heavier. I also think that, as I read a lot of out of copyright books, I could save a small fortune by making myself a free digital library instead of purchasing print copies. I thought it might be interesting to do a little round-up of what I think are the best devices to read on from a strapped for cash student’s point of view. Continue reading

Computerphile and the Kindle text problem

Recently, I have been watching a few videos on the Computerphile YouTube channel. I’ve found a few publishing related videos about typesetting, printing, and ebook text. Computerphile take the most interesting aspects of digital technology and explain them in non-abstract ways that a computing novice can understand. The Computerphile videos I’ve been interested in lately have been ‘The Kindle Text Problem’ and ‘EXTRA BITS – More on E-Reader Text Layouts’. Continue reading

The cookbook vs. YouTube

Photo of Jamie OliverYesterday I hope I demonstrated that cookbooks continue to be successful products for publishing houses and dominate the bestselling hardbacks chart, despite challenges from recipe websites and TV. In today’s post, I’m thinking about how the recipe book can compete with YouTube, and what the competition might mean for the future of the print publication of the cookbook. Continue reading

The cookbook vs. the recipe website

It is often repeated that the publishing house looks for innovation, but actually is unlikely to publish a product that is entirely new. Publishers prefer the tried and tested method, and do not want to risk publishing something that will not sell well enough or lead to a financial loss. I believe that a great way to understand and critique this process within publishing is through the analysis of the development of the cookery book. Throughout history, the cookery book has been able to adapt to subtle changes in audience and big developments in technology. Most recently, recipe books have developed into TV programmes, which have turned into YouTube channels, thus proving their versatile nature and ability to be moulded to fit new formats. Continue reading